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Full text of "Peter Parley's primer : with engravings"

SUMMER. 



PETER PARLEY'S 



P 'K'l M EE. 




WITH ENGRAVINGS. 



ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OP CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1835 ? BY SAMUEL G. GOODRICH* 
IN THE DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE OF MASSACHUSETTS. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
PUBLISHED BY T'. T. ASH 

1835. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



E 
I 



B 
J 



e 



D 




u 



R 



K 



O 



P 
T 



V W X 



Y 



Z 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



a 


b 


c 


d 


e 


f 




h 


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k 


1 


in 


n 


o 


P 




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6 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



THE ALPHABET. 

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t 1 h v r n u 

x i b d m a j 

e g y q p 



D H L P T X Z 

B F J N B V Y 

C G K O S W A 

E I M Q U 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 7 



A a 




Nn 


JYn 


B b 




o 


o 


C c 


C c 


Pp 


Pp 


D d 




Qq 


Q f 


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R r 


B r 


F f 




S 8 


S s 


G g 




Tt 


Tt 


H h 




Uu 


Uu 


it * 

I 1 


/ i 


Vv 


V v 


J J 


J j 


Ww 


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K k 


K k 


Xx 


X x 


L 1 


L I 


Y y 


Yy 


M m 


M m 


Z z 


Z z 



8 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



FIRST TRIAL OF 


SPELLING. 


ab 


eb 


ib 


ob 


ub 


ac 


ec 


ic 


oc 




ad 


ed 


id 


od 


ud 


af 


ef 


if 


of 


uf 


*:* «"r 
**& 










ak 


ek 


ik 


ok 


uk 


al 


el 


il 


ol 


ul 



am em im om um 





PARLEY'S PRIMER. 


9 


an 


en 


in 


on 


un 


ap 


ep 


• 


op 


up 


as 


es 


is 


OS 


Ins 


at 


et 


it 


ot 


ut 


ba 


be 


bi 


bo 


bu 


da 


de 


di 


do 


du 




fe 


I 


fo 


fu 


ha 


he 


hi 


ho 


"I 

hu 


j a 


je 


• • 


j° 





t, 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 







AXE. 
axe. 

BOY. 
boy. 

COW. 
cow. 

DOG. 






EGG. 
e gg- 

FOX. 
fox. 

GIRL, 
girl. 



DUCK. 

duck. 






KID. 

kid. 

LEG. 
leg. 

MAN, 



NUT. 
nut. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



OWL. 

owl. 




QUAIL, 
quail. 

RAT. 



SHIP. 







VINE, 
vine. 

BOW. 

how. 

BOX. 

box. 

YOUTH, 
youth. 

ZEE 
zee. 



FIG 



CUP 



urn. 



hen 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



13 



SPELLING LESSON. 



Ant 


Fish 


Quill 


Bush 


Inn 


Flies 


Deer 


* 

.Leaps 


Horse 


Field 


Near 


Key 


Hung 


Plant 


Mouse 


Land 


Stone 


Runs 


Nag 


Walks 


Small 


Pond 


Bird 


Wren 


Seal 


Elk 


Bear 


Tall 


Goose 


Pig 


Gat 


Jay 


Toad 


Duck 


Land 


Vase 


Band 


Price 


Sand 


Rice 


Oak 


True 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



The ant crawls. 
The bird flies. 
The cat jumps. 
The deer runs. 
The elk is tall. 
The fish has a tail 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




16 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 








The oak is a tree. 



The pig runs fast. 
The quill is good. 
The bear has four legs. 



The seal is oik a rock. 




The toad is in his IM>le. 





The duck is in the 




i 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



17 



The vase has a plant 
in it. 

The wren is on a 



The fox has a goose. 
The boy runs fast. 



Zee is in a book. 





to sue 



18 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 





This dog stands still. 
He has four legs. 



This dog runs fast 
He is a good dog. 





m v 




Phis dog jumps. He 
barks at the pigs. 



This cat climbs 
tree. She ^ 
catch a bird. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



19 




This cat jumps. She 
tries to catch a 



mouse. 





This cat plays with a 
ball. She is a good 
puss. 

This horse eats hay; 
the hay is on the 
ground. 




This horse trots 
He has four feet, 
a long tail. 



and 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




This cow eats grass; she 
loves the grass, for it is 
sweet. 




This cow stands in 
pond. Her feet will get 
wet. 




This cow has a calf. She 
loves her calf, and will 
not let you hurt it. 




The hen eats the corn, 
picks up the corn 
her bill. . 



She 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



9 1 



The hen is in the coop ; 
she would be glad to get 
out. '•; 

The lamb is on a rock; he 
will jump off. He will 
not get hurt. 



SPELLING LESSON. 



brook 


still 


sheep 


corn 


climbs 


calf 


grass 


coop 


cats 


leaps 


locks 


jumps 


rock 


scares 


plays 


both 


books 


school 


ground 


mouth 


bird 


swings 


boys 


fast 


dogs 


hand 


hat 


give 


send 


lend 


bind 


find 





22 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




The boys rim fast. 
They both run 
as fast as they 



can. 




The two boys go to 
school. One boy 
has a bag with 
books in it. 




The two boys sit 
on the ground and 
play. They love 
to play. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



23 




The boy 

the dog. 
loves to 
the boy. 




with 
The dog 





The dog has got the 
boy's hat in his 
mouth. 




The boy has a bird 
on his hand, 
bird tries to talk. 



i 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



here 


slap goose 


shows 


down 


swim stands 


his 


has 


net lid 


hurt 


fur 


knows like 


sharp 


nails 


tame feeds 


sweet 


bite 


legs girls 


StCclls 


chickens 


easy 


retort 


goslings 


many 


rabbit 


water 


being 


turned 


barking 


window 


carry 


playing 


nothing 


sober 


together 


every 


frolic 


scamper 


minding 


shining 



PAELEY'S PRIMER. 




The hen has six chick- 
ens ; she shows 
them how to eat. 




The cow stands still, 
and the sheep lies 
down by her side. 




The two lambs are 
playing together. 
How they scamper 
about ! 



26 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



5 




The dog is barking 
at the sheep. But 
the sheep will not 
let the dog hurt her 
lamb. 




The two geese are by 
the river, and the 
goslings swim in 
the water. 




The goose has four 
goslings. The gos- 
lings swim in the 
pond. 





PARLEY' 


S PRIMER. 


27 




SPELLING 


LESSON. 




field 


graves 


romps 


scratch 


night 


bright 


tears 


match 


right 


light 


wears 


latch 


height 


fight 


shears 


hatch 


fright 


sight 


fears 


patch 


live 


strive 


hive 


drive 


geese 


fowls 


prowls 


wolf 



about 


tuesday 


into 


father 


kitten 


other 


mother 


freedom 


pretty 


printer 


rabbit 


daily 


pointer 


creatures 


pensive 


stately 


quilted 


pasture 



2S 



PARLEY'S PRIME R. 




THE KITTENS. 

The kittens are playing in the parlor. They are 
pretty creatures, with soft fur and paws like velvet. 

But in these soft paws there are sharp nails, and if 
you hurt one of these kittens, she will scratch you. 

By and by the kittens will be cats ; then they will 
catch mice, "and eat them. 

Cats can climb trees, and they will not fall off. 
They love to walk in the fields, where no one can see 
them. 

Cats can see in the dark. They go out. at night 
and catch birds. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




THE TAME RABBIT. 

The boy has a tame rabbit. The rabbit's name 
is Bun : he feeds on clover and sweet apples. 

He is very timid, and will not bite. If a dog 
comes near, he runs away as fast as his legs can 
carry him. 

Bun has a sober face, but he loves a frolic at night; 
when all the girls and boys are asleep, and the moon 
is shining bright, he steals out into the field, and has a 
real game of romps, with the other rabbits. 

Some rabbits are tame, and some are wild. The 
wild rabbits will run away when they see you. 



30 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



THINGS TO REMEMBER. 

L Always keep your hands and face clean. 

2. Wash your hands before you eat 

3. Do not eat in a greedy manner like a pig. 

4. Never slam the doors; go quietly up and down 
stairs ; never make a loud noise in the house. 

5. Avoid three things, a pouting face, angry looks, 
and angry words. 

6. Be kind to your brothers and sisters. 

7. Do as your parents bid you, always. Do no- 
thing that your parents would dislike. 

8. Never hurt a bird, or a dog, or a hen, or a goose, 
or a frog, or a toad, if you can help it. 

9. Be kind and gentle to all living things. 

10. Remember that God made all creatures to be 
happy ; and do not you prevent their being so, with- 
out good reason for it. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



r. 



HOW TO COUNT 

Do you know how to count? Begin. 



One 


Eleven 


Two 


Twelve 


Three 


Thirteen 


Four 


Fourteen 


Five 


Fifteen 


Six 


Sixteen 


Seven 


Seventeen 


Eight 


Eighteen 


Nine 


Nineteen 


Ten 


Twenty 



How many fingers have you on one hand 1 
How many fingers on both hands 1 
How many ears has a cat? 



32 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



How many feet has a dog? 
How many legs has a chair ? 
How many legs have two chairs 1 
How many legs have two hens 1 
How many legs have three geese ? 



OF NUMBERS AND. FIGURES 


• 


One 


1 


Eleven 


11 


Two 


2 


Iwelye 


12 


Three 




1 nirteen 


13 


Four 




Fourteen 


14 


Five 


^^^^^ 


Fifteen 


15 


Six 


6 * 


Sixteen 


16 


Seven 




Seventeen 


17 


Eight 




Eighteen 


18 


Nine 




Nineteen 


19 


Ten 


10 


Twenty 


20 


What number is this, 5 ? — 


this, 4?— this, 3 ?— t 


his, 


6l-~this, 7 ?- 


-this, 2 ? — this, 8 


? — -this, 9 ? — this, 1 


9 — 

• 



&c. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



33 



PART II. 



SPELLING LESSON. 



• 


repose 


awaKe 


Heaven 


watches 


mountain 


parents 


friendship 


darken 


mercies 


humane 


plaintive 


crowing 


inspire 


filling 


singing 


darkness 


sinking 


glances 


prayers 


retire 


j yellow 


father 


assist 


rising 


being 


respect 


. setting 


mankind 


ashamed 


i* shadows 


meadow 


safety 



34 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




MORNING. 

James, it is now morning. The sun is just peep- 
ing over the hills in the east. Get up, get up, my boy, . 
for the sun has just risen ! 

I hope you have said your prayers, and thanked 
your Father in Heaven for all his goodness. I hope 
you have thanked him for your good health, and the 
blessings of a home, of kind parents, of tender friends, 
of pleasant books, and all your other enjoyments. 

Never forget, before you leave your room, to thank 
God for his kindness. He is indeed kinder to us than 
any earthly parent. 

Let us now go out of doors. How beautifully the 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



35 



sun shines upon the hills ! How glorious a thing is 
the sun, and how much like that Being who dwells 
in the Heavens, sending down his mercies upon 
mankind, as the sun sheds its light and its warmth 
upon the world! 



THINGS TO REMEMBER DURING 

THE DAY. 

1. Never tell a lie ; never deceive. 

2. Do every thing your parents have told you to 
do, with a pleasant face. 

3. Never do any thing you fear to tell your parents 
you have done. 

4. Do nothing that you wish to hide from God; 
for if you wish to hide it ever so much, He knows 
it all. 

5. Hurt no living thing if you can avoid it, not even 
a fly. Do not torment geese, pigs, ducks, or other 
creatures, by throwirig stones at them. 




MORNING. 

'T is morning now, the cock is crowing, 
The men are in the meadow mowing, 
The sparkling dew is on the ground, 
And birds are singing all around. 
The bustling wren with noisy throat 
Sends on the breeze his twittering note ; 
The gentle blue-bird glances by, 
The swallow seeks the buzzing fly, 
The busy robin builds her nest, 
The meadow lark, with yellow crest. 
Amid the dewy grass is stealing, 
The crow is o'er the mountain wheeling; 
The mist is rising from the lake, 
So, girls and boys, wake, awake ! 



PARLEY'S PRIMER, 37 



EVENING. 

It is evening. The sun is setting behind the 
mountains, and the shadows begin to darken in the 
forest. 

The birds have ceased to sing, except a lonely 
robin or a thrush, that sits upon the top of a tree, and 
sings a plaintive hymn. 

The farmer has left the field and is going to his 
happy home ; the bee is silent in the hive, the buzzing 
insects are still, and the fowls of the barn-yard, who, a 
little while since, were filling the air with their cackle, 
are now heard no more. 

All around us seems to seek repose, and the very 
hjlk^nd valleys appear to be sinking into gentle sleep. 
We too must soon retire to our pillows ; but before we 
close our eyes, let us lift up our hearts in adoration of 



2s 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



that Great Being who never sleeps, but watches over 
us, as the shepherd watches over his flock. 

Let us ask his forgiveness for our faults, and his aid 
to avoid every sin. Let us seek his friendship, and 
ask him to assist us in being kind and amiable to our 
brothers and sisters, and companions ; in being gentle 
and humane to every living thing ; in obedience and love 
to our parents ; in respect to the aged ; in kindness to 
the sick and unfortunate, and in charity to the poor. 

Above all, let us ask him to fill our hearts with love 
for him; to inspire us with a love of every thing that is 
good; with a dislike of every thing that is evil. Let 
us ask him to make us love to tell the truth, and be 
ashamed to tell a lie. 

Let us ask him to watch over us in our sleep when 
darkness is around us, and none but he is awake to 
keep us from evil. 

Having done this we may safely resign ourselve^Jto 
sleep, in the full confidence that whatever may happen, 
God is our protector and friend. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



39 



THINGS TO THINK OF AT NIGHT. 

1. If you have done any thing during the day 
that is wrong, ask forgiveness of God and your pa- 
rents. 

2. Remember that you should learn some good 
thing every day ; if you have learnt nothing all day, 
that day is lost. 

3. If any one has done you wrong, before you go to 
sleep, forgive him in your heart. 

4. Do not go to sleep with hatred in your heart 
toward any one. 

5. If you have spoken unkind words to a brother or 
sister, go and ask forgiveness. 

6. If you have disobeyed your parents, go and con- 
fess it. 

7. Ask God s to aid you always to do good, and avoid 

- 5: < 




PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



SPELLING LESSON. 



1*11 • J ' 

hill-side 


season 


• 

weeping 


« 

moping 


attire 


dearly 


Kitten 


dewy 


apple 


nonest 


• • 

singing 


laughing 


nimble 


dearest 


amidst 


sleeping 


hopping 


resume 


eheerly 


weather 


• 

insects 


includes 


little 


leafy 


fragrance 


beneath 


silent 


nutter 


brother 


beauty 


even-tide 


frequently 


joyously 


another 


together 


generous 


reposes 


every 


agreeable 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 41 




THE HILL-SIDE. 



I dearly love the hill- side, 

That toward the sun is sloping, 

At morning or at even-tide, 
When merry or when moping. 

I love that sloping hill- side, 
For there, in pleasant weather, 

The kittens play their seek and hide, 
And romp about together. 



And there the little lambs meet 
With honest little faces, 



42 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



The grass beneath their nimble feet, 
They run their merry races. 

But more I love the hill-side, 
That, with my little brother, 

We often on our sleds did slide 
In joy with one another. 

And, Oh ! I love that hill-side, 
For there the boy is sleeping, 

And there at quiet even-tide 
My mother oft is weeping. 

And yet she loves the hill- side, 
And kisses me so cheerly 

When there we meet at even-tide — 
I love, I love it dearly ! 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



43 




SPRING. 

Spring begins with March, and includes March, 
, April and May. March is a cold month, but in April 
the weather grows milder, and in May the soft, warm 
showers call up the sleeping plants, and they put forth 
their bright flowers. 

The apple trees, the peach trees, the pear trees, 
the plum trees, are all in bloom, and the very air is 
full of their fragrance. 

The snow is gone from the mountains and the 
valleys ; the bright full streams go laughing down the 
hill- sides, and the merry birds sing and flutter amidst 
the trees. 



44 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



What a happy season is spring ! How glad is the 
face of every thing ! The hills resume their gay attire ; 
the woods put on their leaves; the insects buzz joy- 
ously in the breeze, and the merry school-boy's shout 
is heard from hill to hill. 

The farmer now begins to plough the ground, and 
prepare it to plant the' corn, and sow the wheat, rye, 
and oats. 

The gardeners dig up the earth, and plant potatoes," 
and sow beets, carrots, lettuce, and other things. 

How pleasant it is to work in the garden ! How de- 
lightful to prune the trees and shrubs ! 

How nice is the milk which the cows afford, now 
thaf they feed on the fresh grass ! 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



45 




TO A VIOLET IN SPRING. 

Little flower ! I love to meet 
Thee peeping from thy grassy bed, 
For thou tell'st of winter fled, 
And thy breath is very sweet. 

Thou tell'st of Spring and blooming roses, 
Of leafy trees where birds are singing, 
Of valleys where the morn comes ringing, 
Or where the silent noon reposes. 

So, little flower, go with me now, 

To one I love the dearest, best, 

One who, with youth and beauty blest, 

Brings hopes and thoughts as- bright as thou. 



46 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



table 


whirling 


native 


lancy 


master 


• 

pieces 


hardly 


advice 


swimming 


iashions 


struggled 


current 


declared 


readers 


delight 


trouble 


pleasant 


staying 


devour 


wiser 


breakfast 


outlet 


meaning 


instant 


himself 


merry 


never 


musty 


wisely 


silly 


cataract 


delicious 


contented 


fisherman 


disobeyed 


conceited 



understood encircled swallowing 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




FABLE. 

I will now tell you a little story called a fable, 
which will teach *you that it is best to obey your 
parents, who are much wiser than you. I do not 
mean that it is all true ; it is only a fancy tale ; but 
you will see that there is a true meaning in it. 

In the winter, the fishes live in the brooks and 
rivers, but they are so cold as to be hardly able to 
move. When Spring comes, and the ice melts, and 
the water grows warm, they feel very happy. They 
then glide and shoot through the clear water, and play 
with each other in a merry fashion. 



4S 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



, Well, in a nice, bright little pond, there once lived a 
family of fishes, called trouts. The pond was on a 
mountain, and it was so encircled by rocks and trees, 
that no fisherman ever came there with his cruel hook. 
So all the fishes were quite safe, and most of them 
were contented and happy. 

But at length, one of the fishes began to think that 
he was wiser than any body else, and declared that he 
would leave this miserable little pond, and go and see 
the big ponds and rivers, which he understood were to 
be found near by. 

Now his father and mother told this conceited trout 
that he was very well off in his native pond, and that 
if he left it he might get into trouble. They told him 
of the cataracts over which he might be dashed in 
pieces, and of the big fishes that might devour him if 
he left his home. 

But all this had no effect. The little trout stole 
away one dark night, and swimming to the outlet of 
the pond, he was carried by a swift current over some 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



49 



rocks, till at length he found himself in a large, fine 
lake. 

It was now a bright morning, and the trout began 
to shoot and glance about in great delight. " What 
a pair of old musty fools my parents are," said he to 
himself, " to stay in that little mountain brook, and to 
think ofkeeping me there too." 

While he was saying this, he saw a worm come 
whirling down by him, attached to a string. " Ah ha," 
said master trout, " this is a fine country indeed. Not 
only is the water very clear, but people bring the 
worms to our very mouths. Oh ! delicious worm! 
what a fine breakfast you will make me !" 

So saying, he dashed at the worm, seized him in 
his mouth, and was on the point of swallowing him, 
when he was jerked out of the water, and in an instant 
was caught by the fisherman. 

The poor fish flounced and jumped and tried to get 
away, but in vain. He now thought of his parents and 
4 



50 



PARLEY'S PRIMER 



their good advice, and wished with all his heart that he 
had never disobeyed them. 

But it was of no use now ; his repentance was too 
late. He struggled for a little time, and then he died. 
He was then taken to the fisherman's house, and being 
fried in fat, was eaten up, and there was the end of this 
silly trout. 

I hope none of my readers will, like this fish, diso- 
bey their parents. They may be sure that their parents 
know best what is good for them, and it is always 
safest to take their advice. 

I know it sometimes seems very pleasant to children 
to do as they please. But let me tell you of a fly, who 
wished to do as he pleased. 

He wanted to go into a bottle that had molasses in 
it. His mother told him not to go. But he chose tc 
do as he pleased. 

So the little fly went in. Pretty soon his legs got 
stuck in the molasses ; unable to get out, he died in 
the bottle. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



51 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



1 "1 

lovely 


honey 


kitten 


truly 


fragrant 


catches 




replied 


device 


busy 


* 

insect 


amongst 


readers 


gather 


daisies 


hopping 


includes 


meadows 


pursuit 


sparkling 


farewell 


hollow 


august 


employ 


stealing 


creatures 


wisely 


silly 


cheerful 


future 


delightful 


plundering 


untiring 


innocent 


every 


butterfly 


attending 


importance 


business 



52 FARLEY'S PRIMER. 




SUMMER. 

It is now Summer. The Summer begins with 
June, the most lovely month of the year. It includes 
June, July and August. 

How warm it is in Summer, and how pleasant to see 
the men mow the grass ! How sweet is the smell of 
the new-mown hay ! 

It is truly a delightful season. In the morning, the 
grass and bushes and flowers are sparkling with dew, 
and the birds are busy on every tree : some are taking 
care of their eggs, and some are feeding their young 
ones. 

They all seem too busy to play ; they are engaged 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



53 



in cares of too much importance. How happy are 
these innocent creatures in thus attending to their 
nests ! 

I hope none of my readers will ever disturb any of 
these pleasant little folks in their cheerful occupations. 
I hope none of them will ever rob their nests of the 
eggs, or carry off the young birds. 

It is much pleasanter to let them alone, and watch 
their labors ; to see the robin, with its red breast and 
its yellow beak, hopping amidst the grass, in search of 
worms. 

Look at the swallow gliding hither and thither, with 
an untiring wing, in pursuit of flies. See the wren as 
he catches a bug, and hies home with it to feed his 
young ones, who dwell in the hollow of a post near the 
barn. 

If we will watch the birds in this way, we may de- 
rive far more pleasure from them, than we can by 
stealing their eggs, or plundering them of their young 
ones. 



o4 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



THINGS TO REMEMBER AT TABLE. 

1. Never take salt with your knife ; take it with the 
salt spoon. 

2. Put your food into your mouth with your fork, 
and not with your knife. 

3. Eat quietly, without noise, and not ravenously, 
like a dog. 

4. Do not take meat with your own fork ; ask some 
one to help you. 

5. Take butter with the butter knife, and not with 
your own knife. 

6. Do at the table as well-bred people do. 

7. Never talk loud at table. 

8. When a person helps you to any thing, say, thank 
you. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



55 




THE BOY AND BEE. 

A little boy, one Summer day, 

Went out among the flowers to play, 

And there he met a little bee, 

And thus he spoke, — " Come, play with me: 
Come, pretty insect, for an hour, 

And let us roam from flower to flower ; 

We '11 seek the rose and lilies light, 

And roam among the daisies white, 

And thus, my pretty bee, we '11 play 

The merry summer morn away." 

But thus the bee replied, — " My boy, 

I must not so my time employ. 



m 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



From morn to night, each busy hour, 
I roam about from flower to flower, 
And gather honey soft and swee^ 
And store it with my little feet 
I store it safely in the cell, 
And my nice work, I do it well ; 
For soon the winter's blast will blow, 
And wrap the meadows all in snow, 
And when the fragrant flowers are dead 
How shall the little bee be fed ? 
But for the honey in his cell, 
The bee would die, and so farewell,; 
Go seek some bug or butterfly, 
For I must be at work — good bye !" 
The bee thus spoke and buzzed away, 
And thus the little boy did say — 
" If this poor insect lives so well, 
And wisely stores his little cell, 
Shall I be idle all the day, 
And waste my summer hours in play ? 



PARLEY'S PRIMES. 



No, no ; I '11 go and get my book, 
And on its pleasant pages look. 
I '11 learn to read, and learn to spell, 
And store my mind as bees their cell ; 
In life's sweet summer I will lay 
Up stores against a winter day, 
And now that life is full of flowers, 
I '11 gather sweets for future hours." 



THINGS TO REMEMBER. 

1. When you read a book, try to learn something 
good from it. 

2. When you go to school, obey the teacher. 

3. When your parents send you of an errand, go 
and return quickly. 

4. Never tell a wrong story, and then say it was 
only make believe. 



58 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



dll III 11111 


winter 


iorsaKe 


turn "ins 

Ij U-X XXX I JO 


oV/lXLIX^X XI 


L/iiiiiiiess 


IJIC'll t y 


1 oil ry» ri 1 TI O* 
IcltlS^IllllM 


pi iixiee 


▼ CtX XAy vX 


vdllllU L 




lllUcilllliy 


VV 1111 llllg 


|~\ 1-1-4- /a t» 


sneiter 


en ti i t*t»<p1 c 
oU till 1 do 


Ul UWllIlff 


miiaest 


supplied 


carrots 


insects 


sadness 


cellar 


joyous 


cherished 


forest 


other 


bosom 


driving 


adieu 


northern 


whisper 


famished 


September 


to-morrow 


november 


October 


repented 


potatoes 


finally 


hovering 


thanksgiving 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



59 




AUTUMN. 

The Autumn comes after the Summer. It con- 
sists of three months, September, October, and No- 
vember. 

The fruits are now ripe, and the farmer is gathering 
in his corn, his potatoes, his apples for the winter, his 
oats, his carrots and his turnips. 

These he stows away in the barn and cellar, so that 
he and his cattle may have plenty to eat during the 
long winter that is coming. 

The nights now begin to be cold, and the white 
frost kills the grass and the flowers. It falls upon the 



60 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



green leaves of the forest, turning some of them yellow, 
some red, some brown, and some purple. 

How bright, varied and beautiful are the forest trees 
in October! But soon, the chill winds come with 
driving rain ; the leaves are sent whirling to the ground; 
and the trees, lately so fair and green, are desolate and 
bare. The wind sighs between them, and they seem 
to whisper to each other in sad and mournful tones. 

But still the Autumn is pleasing. It is very pleasant, 
on a fair day in November, to take a stroll through a 
forest, and pick up the nuts that lie scattered on the 
ground. 

It is pleasant to take Dash, or Pincher, or Tray with 
you, and see him bark at the squirrels that hide amidst 
the stones, or chatter from the limbs of the trees. 

And, finally, Autumn is pleasant when it brings with 
it Thanksgiving day ; a day when all, the poor as well 
as the rich, are supplied with poultry and pumpkin 
pies, and when every heart rises m thanks to God for 
the plenty with which he has blessed them. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER, 



id 




TO A BIRD IN AUTUMN. 

A LITTLE GIRL SPEAKS TO THE BIRD. 

Little bird, do n't go away ! 
Little bird, I prithee stay ! 
Stay and make my bosom glad, 
Stay and do not make me sad. 
I love thy little song at night, 
I love it with the morning light ; 
So, little bird, I prithee stay, 
And do not, do not go away ! 



62 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



LITTLE BIRD, 

Little miss, I hear the wail 

Of winter in the northern gale, 

I hear it moaning in the trees, 

I feel it in the chilling breeze. 

Soon the sleet and frosty snow 

Its mantle o'er the hills will throw, 

And I in vain shall seek to find 

My food, or shelter from the wind. 

So I, my little friend, must fly 

To save my life — good bye, good bye ! 



THINGS TO REMEMBER. 

1. Never speak to any one in an angry and harsh 
voice. 

2. Do not say, I won't ! I sha' n't ! 

3. Never strike your little brothers, or sisters, or 
playmates. 



PARLE Y'S PK1MEK. 



SONG OF AUTUMN. 

Oh mother, mother, tell me why 
The leaves all dead and scattered lie ; 
Why are the fragrant lilies dead ? 
Why are the pinks and daisies fled ? 
Why is the grass, so lately green, 
Now drooping, brown and withered seen? 
Why have the birds all flown away, 
And left the woods so lone and grey? 
Why have the forest walks a sound 
So strange and hollow all around ? 
Why do the hills, that gave me gladness, 
Speak to my heart a secret sadness ? 

I '11 tell you, child — the summer flies, 
And its soft winds forsake the skies. 
A stealing dullness comes at night, 
And o'er the valley throws its blight ; 
The pale frost falls when all are sleeping, 



64 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



Kisses the flowers, and leaves them weeping, 

They droop and on the morrow die ; 

The dead leaves on the cold winds fly ; 

The gay birds feel the coming gale, 

And leave the enchanted hill and vale— 

They seek another clime, and leave 

Thy little heart a while to grieve : 

But be not sad — the winter o'er, 

The smiling spring will come once more, 

And, decked in flowers, the hill and plain 

Ring with the birds' sweet lays again. 



THINGS TO REMEMBER AT CHURCH. 

1. Sit quietly, and speak to no one, but when neces- 
sary. 

2. Listen to the Preacher, and remember what he 

3. Listen to the prayers, and pray with others. 

4. Listen to the hymns, and remember the words 
as well as you can. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



65 



PART III. 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



three 


cold 


some 


nuts 


parts 


snow 


deep 


shall 


bride 


leaves 


grass 


fire 


ice 


air 


teeth 


yes 
hear 


still 


glide 


sleigh 



Wednesday 

winter 

rivers 



person 

story 

thursday 



fingers 

pleasant 

stories 



december 
january 



february unfriended 
Saturday fluttering 



66 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



THE SPIDER, A FABLE. 

A spider had made himself a nice dwelling in the 
corner of a room, but a woman, who was very neat, 
came along with a broom and swept the web away in 
an instant. The spider tumbled to the floor, and in 
fear of being killed, hid himself behind a trunk. 

After a while he crept forth, and finding the window 
open, escaped. He soon came to a place in the grass, 
where he found a young spider with a web all neatly 
woven to the ground ; so he, being very strong, turned 
out the young spider, and took possession of his dwell- 
ing. 

Now this reminds me of some little boys and girls, 
who snatch things away from those who are younger 
than themselves, and thus take what is not their own. 
Such children are like the wicked old spider I have 
been speaking of. 



i 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




THE ROBINS. 

Once, on a chill November day, 
Two robins sat upon a spray ; 
And thus the old one spoke,—" 'T is time, 
My child, to seek a milder clime, 
For soon the wintry winds will blow, 
And these fair lands be wrapped in snow ; 
Then we should seek o'er hill and plain 
For worms and insects all in vain. 
To-morrow, then, at dawn of day, 
We '11 start, my child, and be away ; 
We '11 go to some fair southern scene. 
Where the soft hills are ever green ; 



PARLEY'S PKIMER. 



Where winter, with its chilling breath, 
Ne'er comes to strew the fields with death; 
And there we '11 joyous feast and sing, 
Till winter 's past, and laughing spring 
Returns and strews with flowers the plain, 
And calls us to these woods again." 
Thus spoke the elder bird ; the other 
First jerked his tail; then to his mother 
He pertly said, " Well, you may go, 
But I will stay and risk the snow ; 
I fear no winter's frosty gale, 
No driving sleet, or clattering hail ; 
Beside, I love the hill, the dell, 
The plain, the valley, all too well — 
I cannot leave them, so adieu." 
And thus away the robin flew. 
But, Oh ! how soon the silly bird 
Repented that he had not heard, 
And listened to his mother's tale ; 
For soon the winter's bitter gale 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



Came roaring on with sleet and snow, 
And the poor robin, faint and low, 
Unfriended, famished and alone, 
Sat shivering on a -cold grey stone. 
A prowling owl came hovering near,— 
The robin's heart beat quick with fear; 
But his light wing, which once could rise 
On the blue air, and win the skies, 
Was stiff and cold ; and though he tried, 
In vain his fluttering pinions plied, — 
He fell upon the ground, and there 
The hungry owl did pick him bare. 



70 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




WINTER. 

There are three winter months, December, Janu- 
ary and February ; the weather is cold in winter, and 
in some parts of the country the snow is very deep. 

The birds are now gone from the trees ; the leaves, 
and the grass, and the flowers are dead ; the rivers are 
covered with ice, and the air is so cold that it seems to 
bite the nose and fingers as if it had teeth. 

But still, it is pleasant to glide over the snow in a 
sled or sleigh, and at night it is pleasant to sit by* a 
bright fire and eat nuts and hear some person tell stories. 

Shall I tell you a story of a winter night 1 I suppose 
you will say yes ; so, after a spelling lesson, you shall 
have the story. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



71 



SPELLING LESSONS. 



valley 


distress 


pursued 


occurred 


wrapping 


often 


hardly 


ruffled 


children 


heaping 


entered 


howling 


CU \J tlllU. 


nil in 11 ii 

llLLlllCtll 


bui prise 


TQT*TYl PI* 
Ictl J.11C1 


O T*T*1 C*f\ 

Dal l icil 


"f" f~\ TITO "f ir\ C 

LU W dl (IS 


11 uot y 


Illici t LCI 


• • 

pinions 


hickory 


attempted 


piteous 


listening 


eagerly 


proceeded 


hastily 


quantity 


discovered 


however 


suddenly 


happiness 


continued 


unhappy 


verily 


determined 


beseeching 


untruly 



72 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




A WINTER STORY. 

Many years ago, there was a farmer who lived in a 
valley between two mountains. The place was wild 
and solitary, and in winter few persons travelled that 
way. 

It was on a winter night that what I am going to 
relate occurred. The. ground was covered with snow, 
and the roads were buried in the deep drifts, so that it 
was hardly possible for a sleigh or even a horse to get 
along. 

The weather was exceedingly cold and stormy ; but 
the farmer had plenty of oak and hickory wood, and 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



73 



heaping a great quantity upon the fire, he and his family 
were quite happy by the bright blaze. 

They sat around the fire, some of them cracking nuts, 
others eating apples, and others listening to a story, 
which the farmer was telling of his eldest son. 

The story was this: — When this son was about ten 
years old, he was at work in the valley by his father's 
side. Near them was a group of bushes, in which 
some Indians lay concealed. 

The farmer did not see these Indians, till, suddenly 
springing from the copse, they seized the boy, and 
hastily fled with him into the woods. The father pur- 
sued, but he could not find either the Indians or his 
child. 

Several years had now passed away, and all hopes 
of his return had fled. Often and often had the father 
and mother sighed over the loss of their boy, and often 
had the brothers and sisters wept at his unhappy story. 

Still, it was pleasant to talk of him, and the poor 



74 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



farmer was frequently heard to tell the story, painful as 
it might seem, to the children. 

The story had just now been told for the hundredth 
time, and the cheeks of the boys and girls were yet 
wet, when the howling of a dog was heard at the door. 
The sound was strange and unexpected, and each 
member of the family looked round, with a gaze of 
surprise and expectation. 

The farmer however went to the door. He there 
found a large, shaggy dog, covered with snow and frost, 
for the night, as I have said, was cold, and exceedingly 
stormy. He told the dog to come in, but he would not 
enter ; he only howled and looked piteously towards 
the woods, as if beseeching the farmer to go in that 
direction. 

The good man began to fear that some one was in 
distress, and as the dog continued to howl, and would 
run a little toward the wood, and then return with a 
fawning and piteous look, he had no doubt that his 
fears were well founded. 



PARLEY'S PE1MEK. 



75 



He immediately determined to follow the dog, and 
wrapping himself in a wolf-skin coat, he went forth. 
The wind roared through the trees, and the snow came 
pouring over the tops of the mountains in innumerable 
flakes, but the kind heart of the farmer did not shrink 
from his duty. 

The dog led the way, and the farmer followed. The 
snow was so deep, and the way through the wood so 
rugged, that they did not proceed very fast. They 
went on however for nearly an hour. 

At length, they came to a cave in a rock, and the dog 
entered. The farmer hesitated, but getting on his 
hands and knees, he went into the cave. It was so dark 
that he could see nothing, but he heard some one groan. 

He proceeded to' the place where the sound came 
from, and found there a human being. He spoke, but 
no one answered. He attempted to raise the person 
upon his feet, but found that he could not stand. 

He then determined to carry him to his house. The 
farmer was a strong man ; so, taking the person on 



76. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



his shoulder, he forced his way through the deep snow 
to his house. 

He now discovered that it was a young man, bruised 
as if by a fall, and faint from the loss of blood. The 
farmer's wife did every thing she could, but it was a 
long time before the poor youth could speak. 

When he did speak, his voice sounded familiar to 
the ears of all. " Surely," said the farmer, "I have 
heard that voice before." 

The idea now came into the mind of the farmer's 
wife, that it was her son. She looked eagerly in the face 
of the young man, and exclaimed, "My son, my son!" 

It was really her son, and he was soon able to tell 
his story. It appeared that he had been carried into 
captivity by the Indians, and after suffering many hard- 
ships, had escaped. 

He had wandered several days in the woods, when 
by chance he fell from a rock, and was badly bruised. 
He was only able to crawl into the cave, where he was 
rescued by his father. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



77 




THE LAMBS, CATS AND DOGS. 

Come, little Henry, come and see 
- The lambs that yonder run : 
They skip and scamper merrily, 
And have a deal of fun. 



Now look at yonder dog and cat, 
And see them snarl and snap : 

Each looks as surly as a rat 
That's got into a trap. 



And why the little lambs so gay, 
So happy on the hill ?— - 



78 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



Because they 're gentle in their play, 
And love each other well. 

And why the cat and dog so sad, 
So wretched and so grey 1 — 

Their tempers, they are very bad, 
They 'd rather fight than play. 

And now, my little Henry, hear, — 
Would you be glad and gay, 

Like lambs, be ever kind, my dear, 
To all who with you play. 

And do not, like a dog or cat, 

Be spiteful to another — 
Let children all be kind, and that 

Will make them love each other. 



PRIMEB* 




NANCY RAY. 

|#TTLE GIRL WHO LOST HER BIRD. 

bird is dead, 
^ Aiid Nancy Ray, 
My" bird is dead, 
I cannot play. 

■RVSang so sweetly, 
p- Every day, 
P|e sings no more, 
I cannot play. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



Go put his cage 
Far, far away, 

I do not love 
His cage to day. 

She wiped her eyes, 
Poor Nancy Ray, 

And sat and sighed, 
But could not play. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



SI 




THE SUN. 

The sun rises in the east. The sun sets in the 
west. When the sun rises it is morning. When the 
sun sets it is evening. 

The sun makes it warm by day, and thus it causes 
the flowers, plants and trees to grow. If the sun did 
not shine there would be no plants, or trees, or flowers ; 
the earth would become frozen, and all men and ani- 
mals would die. 

In summer, the sun is nearly over our heads, and this 
is the reason that it is then so hot. In winter the sun 
is far to the south, and low down, and therefore it be- 
comes cold; the streams are frozen, the leaves fall 
6 



c, , 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



from the trees, and the snow covers the earth. But 
although it is cold out of doors, we build good fires, and 
thus are comfortable and happy. 




THE MOON. 

The moon shines at night. Sometimes it is bent 
like a bow, and sometimes it is round. When is quite 
round it is called the full moon. 

The moon does not shed as much light as the sun ; 
but it gives a mild and beautiful light, and thus often 
renders the night very pleasant, which otherwise would 
be dark and gloomy. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



S3 



In summer it is delightful to walk forth by moonlight. 
The air then is soft, yet refreshing; the winds play gently 
amidst the trees and shrubs. The little streams, as 
they flow on, catch the beams of the moon, and seem 
to toss them about, as children play with little toys. 

All around is still, so that you can hear the slightest 
noise. The shivering of the leaves seems like the 
whispers of people near; the sighing of the winds in 
the grass appears like the voice of some one flying un- 
seen through the air. 

The notes of a flute at a distance come to the ear 
with wonderful clearness; the rumbling of a wagon 
afar off sounds near at hand ; and the baying of the 
watch dog on the distant hill seems as if it was at the 
next house. 

And how beautiful are the trees in the moonlight. 
Every thing that is unpleasing is hidden by the dark- 
ness, and only that which is lovely comes to view. 
Thus, all that we see, all that we hear> all that we feel* 
brings us pleasure in the serene moonlight. 



84 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



And how the sense of smell is regaled with the fra- 
grance of flowers, and the sweet scent of the new-mown 
hay, at this delightful season ! I hope my little readers 
will think of these things, and go forth, and see if they 
are not true ; and when they find them to be so, I hope 
they will look up in thanksgiving to Him who has sent 
them, amid a thousand other blessings, the pleasures 
of the summer moonlight evening. 




What child is there, that has never looked up with 
wonder at the stars ! I once knew a little boy, who, 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 
1 . a 



85 



after looking at them for a long time, went to his mother 
and said : 

"Mother, you call these bright things in the sky, 
stars; but I think that is not the right name for them." 

" Well, my child," said his mother, " what do you 
think they are?" 

« Why, I think they are God's candles," said the boy. 
And this idea is at once natural and beautiful. They 
indeed seem like lamps, set in the magnificent Hall of 
the Creator, to show forth its grandeur, and call upon 
the universe to worship Him who sitteth upon the 
throne, for ever and ever. 

But whatever the stars may seem to be, we have 
reason to suppose that they are worlds, inhabited, like 
this earth, by countless multitudes of living beings. 

How wonderful then are these shining orbs, and how 
great must He be, who in wisdom and goodness has 
made them all ! Let us look up to him with adoration, 
and indulge in the hope, that when we leave this earth, 
he will take us to heaven, where we may study the stars, 
and learn all the glorious things that God has done. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 
t 



ABOUT FIGURES. 



I have told you about counting at page 31. I will 
now tell you about figures. 



Twenty-one 


21 


Thirty-six 


36 


Twenty-two 


22 


Thirty-seven 


37 


Twenty-three 


23 


Thirty-eight 


38 


Twenty-four 


24 


Thirty-nine 


39 


Twenty-five 


25 


Forty 


40 


Twenty-six 


26 


Forty-one 


41 


Twenty-seven 


27 


Forty-two 


42 


Twenty-eight 


28 


Forty-three 


43 


Twenty-nine 


29 


Forty-four 


44 


Thirty 


30 


Forty-five 


45 


Thirty-one 


31 


Forty-six 


46 


Thirty-two 


32 


Forty-seven 


47 


Thirty-three 


33 


Forty-eight 


48 


Thirty-four 


34 


Forty-nine 


49 


Thirty-five 


35 


Fifty 


50 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



87 



Fifty-one 


51 


Seventy-one 


71 


Fiity-two 


52 


Seventy-two 


72 


TTl • Pi ,1 

Fiity- three 


53 


Seventy-three 


73 


TV Pi P 

Fitty-tour 


54 


Seventy-four 


74 


Fiity-five 


55 


Seventy-five 


75 


Fiity-six 


56 


Seventy-six 


76 


Fifty-seven 


57 


Seventy-seven 


77 


Fifty-eight 


58 


Seventy-eight 


78 


Fifty-nine 


59 


Seventy-nine 


79 


Sixty 


60 


Eighty 


80 


Sixty-one 


61 


Eighty-one 


81 


Sixty-two 


62 


Eighty-two 


82 


Sixty-three 


63 


Eighty-three 


83 


Sixty-four 


64 


Eighty-four 


84 


Sixty-five 


65 


Eighty-five 


85 


Sixty-six 


66 


Eighty-six 


86 


Sixty-seven 


67 


Eighty-seven 


87 


Sixty-eight 


68 


Eighty-eight 


88 


Sixty-nine 


69 


Eighty-nine 


89 


Seventy 


70 


Ninety 


90 



8S 


PARLEY'S 


PRIMER. 




Ninety-one 


91 


Ninety-six 


96 


Ninety-two 


92 


Ninety-seven 


97 


Ninety-three 


93 


Ninety-eight 


98 


Ninety-four 


94 


IVin pfv-ninp 


QQ 


Ninety-five 




One Hundred 


100 




OF ANIMALS. 

If you look about, you will see various living things, 
called animals. Some live on the ground, others fly 
into the air, and others dwell in the waters. 

Dogs, cats, cows, horses, sheep, bears, lions, ele~ 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



89 



phants, and many others, have four legs, and all ani- 
mals which have four legs are called quadrupeds. 

Now can you tell me whether a rabbit is a quadru- 
ped or not ? And is a rat, or a mouse, a quadruped 1 
Is a kitten a quadruped ? 

Birds have feathers, and almost all of them can fly. 
Some of them fly so easily, that they seem to live a 
great part of the time in the air. They are generally 
very beautiful, and most of them are very innocent 
creatures. 

Little creatures like bees, bugs, flies, and butterflies, 
are called insects. They are small, and some of 
them live but a short time. In winter most of 
them die, and the rest creep into holes, and sleep till 
spring. 

Fishes inhabit the waters. Some fishes are only as 
big as a pin's point, while others are as big as a wind- 
mill. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 




BIRDS. 

BY MRS. HALE. 

If ever I see 

On bush or tree, 

Young birds in their pretty nest 

I must not in my play 

Steal the birds away, 

To grieve their mother's breast. 

My mother I know 
Would sorrow so, 
Should I be stolen away ; 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



So I '11 speak to the birds, 
In my sweetest words, 
Nor hurt them in my play. 

And when they can fly 

In the bright blue sky, 

They '11 warble a song to me ; 

And then if I am sad 

It will make me glad, 

To think they are happy and free. 



92 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



MORE ABOUT FIGURES 



One hundred and one 101 

One hundred and two ,102 

One hundred and three 103 

One hundred and four 104 

One hundred and five 105 

One hundred and six 106 

One hundred and seven 107 

One hundred and eight 108 

One hundred and nine 109 

One hundred and ten 110 

One hundred and eleven 111 

One hundred and twelve 112 

One hundred and thirteen 113 

One hundred and fourteen 114 

One hundred and fifteen 115 

One hundred and sixteen 116 

One hundred and seventeen 117 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



93 



One hundred and eighteen 118 

One hundred and nineteen 1 19 

One hundred and twenty 120 

One hundred and twenty-one 121 

One hundred and twenty- two 122 

One hundred and twenty - three 123 

One hundred and twenty-four 124 

One hundred and twenty-five 125 

One hundred and twenty-six 126 

One hundred and twenty-seven 127 

One hundred and twenty-eight 128 
One hundred and twenty-nine . 129 

One hundred and thirty 130 

One hundred and thirty- one 131 

One hundred and thirty- two 132 

One hundred and thirty-three 133 

One hundred and thirty-four 1 34 

One hundred and thirty-five 135 

One hundred and thirty-six 136 

One hundred and thirty-seven 137 



94 



PARLEY'S PRIME R. 




FAREWELL! 



Now, my little reader, we have come to the end of ' 
the book, and I must bid you farewell. I. am an old 
man, and may never talk to you again. Before we 
part, let me give you a little advice. 

You are now a little child ; you are but a few years 
old, and have not much knowledge. Therefore, lis- 
ten to your parents; they are older than you; they 
know better what is good for you. It is wise for you 
always to do what they command, and never to do 
what they forbid. 

There was once a little child sitting on the ground. 



PARLEY'S PRIMER. 



A wasp came crawling near. The child put out her 
hand to catch the wasp. 

The child's mother spoke, and told the child not to 
touch the wasp ; " For it has a sharp sting," said she, 
" and if you touch it, it will hurt you cruelly." 

Now the silly child would not mind its mother. So 

' she reached out her hand, and took the wasp , in her 
fingers. The insect then run its sting into her thumb, 

* and hurt her very much. The child screamed with 
pain, and for a long time was in great distress. 

Now, you see that this child's mother knew more than 

v she did, and if she had taken her mother's advice, she 
would have escaped the pain of being stung by a wasp. 

I hope my little readers will also remember that 
there is a great and good Being in Heaven, to whom 
they must pray every night and morning; one who 
sees them in all their walks, and in all their ways ; one 
who hates a lie, and punishes the deceiver. 

j >^e all my little readers will also be kind and gentl.e 

Hfe*V. ~-l%,,brothers and sisters, and playfellows. In- 



96 PARLEY'S PRIMER. 

dulge in no hard words ; be guilty of no ill-natured 
tricks ; tell no ill-natured tales. Do to other children 
as thev would wish other children to do to them. 

. I - hope "my little friends will all learn to read and 
spell and write. When their parents or teachers set 
them a lesson, I hope they will he patient, and attend 
to it well If you are set to learn some lines by heart, 
or to get a spelling lesson, study it well, and do not 
say it till you know every word and letter. 

And now/ my dear reader. Old Peter Parley, who 
has made this book for your amusement, wishes you 
may be good, wise and happy, and commending you 
to God, bids you farewell ! 




ground*